Spit Happens #53 – Paso Robles

PASOROBLES1 I recently spent 3 months in the US on a vacation. A large majority of that time was in the desert of New Mexico and Arizona, not quite a wine wilderness but darn close. On the way back we made a left turn and drove all the way to Paso Robles to visit some wineries and chill out in California wine country. Paso Robles has a different vibe than Napa Valley. A bit less Cabernet/Chardonnay and a bit more Syrah and Zinfandel. There is Cabernet there… just not the eye watering prices of Napa and the quality is outstanding. One producer I always look for is Daou Winery located on a mountaintop with breathtaking views for 75-100 miles in every direction this a winery committed to making dense age worthy reds.  The Cabernets are stellar and the Syrah/Grenache/Mourvedre is a surprising treat. Pinot Noir from Santa Lucia Highlands and Chardonnay round out the offerings. There are also library wines and magnum offering available to mailing list members. Definitely worth your time to visit and deserving of a place in your cellar. Pretty highly regarded in the wine press as well. Not too subtle but can drink young or old. PASOROBLES2 My next choice is Justin Vineyards.  The property was planted in 1981 and the first commercial vintage was released in 1987, The Isosceles  Cabernet patterned after quality Left Bank Bordeaux is the most notable wine they make but the other wines are up to the task. A visit here is worth the effort. A beautiful facility and all the tools to make great wine.  Wine maker Scott Shirley came to Justin after a career at Hess Collection and Opus One. So he knows a bit about wine making. The winery completed an upgrade in 2013 and now has accommodation and a top notch hospitality program.  What are you waiting for?   PASOROBLES3Number 3 winery is Turley Cellars. In the category, I call big stupid wines for big stupid guys. Ladies fill your boots as well. Massive Zinfandels from all over California, rich robust Petite Syrah and even a Cabernet more recently. My old employer in Vancouver was (I think) the first export account for the winery. Early vintages of the PS from 1993 are still improving.  Always a treat to share these wines the big challenge is storage. They have super annoying shaped bottles that don’t stack in bins well and necks that don’t allow neck tags on them. Make sure Ramona gives you lots of individual bottle storage options if you want to age these beasts… PS The Old Vine Charbono ain’t half bad either. first. Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/. Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot

Spit Happens #52 – Tokaj

tokajHave you tried Tokaj? Have you heard of Tokaj? If not it’s time for you to stretch your brain a bit. Tokaj is is the name of the wines from the Tokaj wine region in Hungary or the adjoining Tokaj wine region in Slovakia. This region is noted for its sweet wines made from grapes affected by noble rot, a style of wine which has a long history in this region. From Wikipedia: Aszú: This is the world-famous sweet, topaz-colored wine known throughout the English-speaking world as Tokay. The original meaning of the Hungarian word aszú was “dried”, but the term aszú came to be associated with the type of wine made with botrytised (IE. “nobly” rotten) grapes. The process of making Aszú wine is as follows.
  • Aszú berries are individually picked, then collected in huge vats and trampled into the consistency of paste (known as aszú dough). Must or wine is poured on the aszú dough and left for 24–48 hours, stirred occasionally.
  • The wine is racked off into wooden casks or vats where fermentation is completed and the aszú wine is to mature. The casks are stored in a cool environment, and are not tightly closed, so a slow fermentation process continues in the cask, usually for several years.
  • The concentration of aszú was traditionally defined by the number of puttony of dough added to a Gönc cask (136 liter barrel) of must. Nowadays the puttony number is based on the content of sugar and sugar-free extract in the mature wine. Aszú ranges from 3 puttonyos to 6 puttonyos, with a further category called Aszú-Eszencia representing wines above 6 puttonyos. Unlike most other wines, alcohol content of aszú typically runs higher than 14%. Annual production of aszú is less than one percent of the region’s total output.
Tokay ( the English spelling ) was a term that used to be used to describe Pinot Gris from Alsace and a style of sweet wine from the Rutherglen region in Australia as well. In more recent times it has been phased out and is now a protected terminology for wines from Hungary/Slovakia exclusively. If you are up for it I suggest trying Tokaj Aszu 5 Puttonyos Chateau Dereszla 10 listed by the BC Liquor Stores Link. Also available at Everything Wine. This delicious Tokaj is showing some nice mature flavors and has a depth and texture that would be a challenge for other winemakers to provide for the price.  The botrytis flavor really shines here. Brilliant with aged Gouda or the great Canadian Cheese Oka. Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/. Also, check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot

Spit Happens #51 – Sticky Winter Nights

spithappens51A number of years ago when we lived in Vancouver my wife and I did a series of tastings over the course of 6 years. We called it “Sticky Night in December” . It was an evening of approx 10 homemade desserts and a matching number of dessert wines AKA “ Stickies”.  We would make a guest list of approximately 30 people and usually about 22-25 would show up. Lots of customers and wino friends and the occasional Master of Wine Candidate. It was an enormous amount of work for my wife and a lot of patient collecting on my part. We would include Madeira, Port, Sauternes, Barsac, Monbazillac, Trockenbeerenauslese, Rutherglen Fortifieds, older rare late harvest Zinfandel from California, BC Ice wine, Commanderie St John from Cyprus as well and Vin Santo and Banyuls ( France’s version of Port made with fortified Grenache )  Each was specifically matched with a cake, biscotti, chocolate or other sweet treat and each guest was handed a list of all the dessert wines and desserts. We would let them pour the wines for themselves and portion the dessert to suit their tastes. Each guest could come and go at their own schedule and at the end of the night they all got a goodie bag filled with dessert items suitable for travel. It was in the top 5 tastings we ever put on in our home. The reason is it was very satisfying to hear people say to me or each other “ I have never tried this before and it’s amazing “ or “ I never buy these wines because they are too sweet, but know I know why David like them “ also the comments about the pairings were interesting.  I’m the first person in the room to express a preference for cheese and dessert wine as an after dinner treat rather than a sweet dessert but given enough time to think about it and tweak a recipe the results can be sublime. In the spirit of those events I would love to tell you about three of my favorite styles of dessert wine that are a little less traditional.
  • Banyuls, as mentioned earlier Banyuls is France’s version of port. Grenache dominant and typically slightly lower in alcohol than Port. Absolutely brilliant with chocolate based dessert. Individual chocolate that have dried fruit in them and flour less chocolate torte are among some of my favorite matches. Legacy Liquor Store in Vancouver has some Chapoutier Banyuls for sale.
  • Rutherglen Fortifieds, I view the Albury Wodonga region of Australia referred to as Rutherglen should be a World Heritage site and is worthy of a special trip to Australia just for these wines. Muscats, muscadelle and other fortified wines aged in a reductive environment, often not in a coo,l cellar but a passive above ground storage, sit in casks for 10 20 30 years before being bottled and in my view sold for ridiculously cheap prices. Britannia Wine Merchants in Alberta had a single bottle of Seppelt DP 59 for sale and it’s brilliant.
  • Sauternes, while wine drinkers know about these wines they rarely buy them and age them, often purchasing them just before a tasting or dinner with very little planning. In my view a well aged Sauternes is a thing of beauty and worthy of a place on your dinner table, buy them and age them 5-15 years and call me. My old store, Marquis Wine Cellars has a small selection of 375ml Sauternes.
Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ . Also, check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot

Spit Happens #50 – Drink Your Good Stuff

After being in the wine business since I was in my mid 20’s I have noticed a trend that happens to occur among people who have wine cellars. They often buy too much and end up drinking wine that’s over the hill or don’t drink them at all. There can be a tendency among humans as they age to have a change in how they process smells and flavor profiles. IE the older wines are too subtle to be enjoyed as the tannins and aromatics are muted by age. There is also a tendency for wine drinkers and collectors to say “I bought Wine X for 25$ a bottle years ago and now it’s worth 500$ now it’s too expensive to drink. I’m here to make an impassioned plea to you that you should drink those wines. First of all, life is precious. I have been asked to inventory cellars of deceased wine collectors and they often have only Blue Chip wines ( a lot of them ) and tended to drink the lesser wines first to defer ratification. What are you waiting for? I know the wines you select are special to you but you likely have only 6 or 7 special occasions in a year. How many special occasion bottles do you have? I bet a lot more than you need. Now I hear you saying it’s too good I need to save it. Chances are those super duper special occasion wines might not meet your expectations as you build too much into it. How about a nice dinner on a Tuesday night and just open it and share with someone special. Notice that I said someone… I’m not in favor of the idea that you need to get 10 people together and everybody gets 2 ounces. Savor the whole bottle over the course of an evening. Enjoy it’s development and don’t think of it’s value. From an economic perspective it’s a sunk cost, just drink it… Hell drink it with take out pizza but don’t fetishize it and collect just for the sake of it. A well known collector in Vancouver once gave me a bottle of 61 Parce Banyuls as a present. I thought WOW that’s generous but 2 days later I drank it with a few friends. Why? Because tomorrow is only a promise… not a guarantee. I have been fascinated by a singer named Laura Pergozzi. She has a song called Lost on You. The line “Smoke ’em if you got ’em “ is never more true when it comes to your wine. Lost on You LP When you get older, plainer, saner When you remember all the danger we came from Burning like embers, falling, tender Long before the days of no surrender Years ago and well you know Smoke ’em if you got ’em ‘Cause it’s going down All I ever wanted was you I’ll never get to heaven ‘Cause I don’t know how Let’s raise a glass or two To all the things I’ve lost on you Oh oh Tell me are they lost on you? Oh oh Just that you could cut me loose Oh oh After everything I’ve lost on you Is that lost on you? Oh oh Is that lost on you? Oh oh Baby, is that lost on you? Is that lost on you? Wishing I could see the machinations Understand the toil of expectations in your mind Hold me like you never lost your patience Tell me that you love me more than hate me all the time And you’re still mine So smoke ’em if you’ve got ’em ‘Cause it’s going down All I ever wanted was you Let’s take a drink of heaven This can turn around Let’s raise a glass or two To all the things I’ve lost on you Oh oh Tell me are they lost on you? Oh oh Just that you could cut me loose Oh oh After everything I’ve lost on you Is that lost on you? Oh oh Is that lost on you? Oh oh, oh oh Bab, is that lost on you? Is that lost on you? Let’s raise a glass or two To all the things I’ve lost on you Oh oh Tell me are they lost on you? Oh oh Just that you cold cut me loose Oh oh After everything I’ve lost on you Is that lost on you? Is that lost on you? Songwriters: Laura Pergolizzi / Nathaniel Campany / Michael Gonzales Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot

Spit Happens #49 – Big Bottles

SpitHappens51PDF Page 2 Image 0001Do you like big bottles? Do you have any space in your racks/cooler for magnums and larger sizes? I’m thinking you should at least consider it. First of all 750ml is too small a bottle, I refer to these size bottles as “shooters”. By the time you are just getting a sense of the quality, taste and texture the bottle is gone. Besides that what happens when you get more than 4 people at the dinner table. You have to open a second bottle anyways. They really look impressive… call me shallow but when someone shows up for dinner and plunks a magnum on the table you have my undivided attention. In particular I think magnums of champagne show really well with bottle age, years ago I read an article in the Wine Advocate when it was just Robert Parker writing it. He opined that while he liked aged Champagne in general it was the magnums that showed particularly well in tastings and he would often score the same wine higher in tastings versus 750ml bottles. I suspect it might be a difference in the ratio of air to wine in a 1.5 litre vs 750ml. Another consideration is auctions, consistently magnums receive higher bids at charity auctions. This can be a great way too boost the proceeds of a charity auction for your kids sports team or parent teacher association. You will score points with your spouse who puts up with your wine collection obsession and with your kids who normally roll their eyes at the thought of wine. Eventually they will all see the light. The names are fun as well many are Biblical in origin. Dating back to the Roman Catholic and religious orders influence in grape growing and wine making.
  • Magnum is standard 1.5 litre
  • Jeroboam is 3 litres but can be 4.5 litres in Bordeaux
  • Imperial or Methuselah is 6 litres
  • Salmanazar is a 9 litre
  • Balthazar is 12 litres
  • Nebuchadnezzar is 15 litres
Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ . Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot

Spit Happens #48 – Wine Trends in BC and Beyond Part 3

laughingstockwineryIn Spit Happens 46 and 47 I wrote about the concept of Terroir and new farming techniques like Organic and Bio-dynamic farming. This time I’m going to discuss fermentation techniques and why you pick 1 vessel, say a 225 litre barrel over a puncheon ( and why you want wood at all) or why you might want to use Amphoras, Eggs or Concrete tanks. Wineries must be constantly seeking to improve the wines they sell. This means upgrading viticultural practices, identifying new yeast strains ( not very sexy ) as well as looking at fermentation processes. This means how do you ferment and the vessels you use to do that. Oak has a critical role in wine making, it affects the grapes in much the same way that vanilla extract contributes to flavor in baking. Adding texture and mouthfeel, softening tannin, allowing suspended solids to drop out and thereby clarifying the wine are other benefits of oak aging. There are a few downsides to oak. Number one is it’s expensive. Number two is it’s a clumsy tool in the wrong hands and can overwhelm some of the more subtle flavors in cooler climate BC wine. So wineries started to look for techniques that were more delicate on the wines and could be a unique selling proposition as well. Amphora’s, large concrete eggs and larger wood fermentation vessels started to appear. Amphora’s are usually clay vessels that have a neutral effect on the wine allowing varietal character to show through. Concrete eggs are often a step up in size from amphora. The shape of the eggs allows the yeast to remain in suspension longer during ferments due to the temperature changes from top to bottom allowing for a slow mixing of the contents. This leads to a bit more autolysis ( exchange of flavors into the wine from the dead yeast cells, called lees). One of the wineries utilizing the eggs and amphora to a high degree of success is Laughing Stock Winery. They have a number of wines that are 100% concrete egg ferments and a few more wines that individual components might receive time in the eggs. They have also created Amphora fermented Syrah that spends 8 months untouched in 2 x 500 litre containers. The 2017 was just released to their wine club members for $49.99 on November 6th. Check it out. Laughing Stock Winery wine making team Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/. Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot . Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot

Spit Happens #47 – Wine Trends in BC and Beyond Part 2

In Spit Happens 46 I wrote about the concept of Terroir and how the BC Wineries are starting to implement concepts of sense of place into their wine making and marketing. Farming their vineyards is another way of standing out from the crowd. How many different ways are there to farm? The answer is quite a few but there are a few ways in which your farming can result in better outcomes for your brand and the long term health of your winery. As with single vineyard wines the concept of farming differently than your neighbors and telling the customer was not widespread. Summerhill and Hainle winery were notable exceptions. As more wineries and vineyards started to develop in BC the need for a unique selling proposition became more apparent. If you can turn a specific farming ethic into a way to sell wine even better. Organic and Bio-dynamic farming are the most widely accepted techniques in grape growing . Lets start with the first , organic. This refers only to the farming techniques not the wine making. To farm organically is exactly that. No synthetic pesticides, herbicides or fungicides. Even fence post composition in the vineyard can be specified as pressure treated fence posts may have trace elements of arsenic in them . There are also requirements about the length of time you must practice these techniques before certification will be issued . This amount of time and farming regime varies by country to country and by which organization is offering the certification. Also try to remember that Organic grape growing is different than Organic wine making which precludes the addition of sulphites. Examples of organic certified wineries are Kalala , Off the Grid , Rollingdale and Covert farms as well as the Free Form Wine made by the team at Crushpad/Haywire.Total number is between 35-40 with a few more in process. spithappens47 Bio-dynamic farming refers to a more holistic approach to farming it encompasses natural fertilization techniques , no synthetic fertilization and adherence to a calendar that is a template for your farming . There are specific days in the month that are acceptable for specific tasks and you need to follow those proscribed practices to maintain your certification. Think of it as grape growing with horoscopes . ( Now I’m gonna be in trouble ) Currently the only winery certified Bio-dynamic certification is Summerhill. Why do any of this as it might or might not lead to a better tasting wine ? The answer lies within ourselves. Wineries that follow these principle do so because they feel it’s the right thing to do. As a wine buyer we need to ask ourselves the same thing. Do we simply care about the taste ? Or do we care about how our food and drink is prepared and grown and how our decisions on what we eat and drink effects our environment. Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/. Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot  

Spit Happens #46 – Wine Trends in BC and Beyond

In my new life as a wine tour guide I spend a lot of time behind the scenes at wineries talking to winemakers owners and marketing staff. They alert me to upcoming releases of wines , vineyard acquisitions and all sorts of new things happening in the Okanagan wine scene. This invariably leads to discussions with the tour guests about what’s happening in the industry. I try to focus the discussion on trends that increase the wine quality or that raise the profile of the BC wine industry in a more general way. One of the major trends in BC is wineries that explore the concept of Terroir . Terroir is a French word that means sense of place. It’s your vineyards aspect to the sun, soil type, diurnal temperature changes (daytime to nighttime ) and anything else that is different than your neighbour . If you can demonstrably show that your piece of dirt is significantly unique from another winery and makes a noticeable difference to the flavour , aromatics or structure to the wine you make you can legitimately charge more for the wine. In business we call that a unique selling proposition. This process has been under way in BC for awhile with varying degrees of success. Why didn’t we do it right at the start of our wine industry ? The answer is it didn’t matter until it did matter. Cryptic huh ? When our industry was in it’s infancy Terroir was a detriment to it as we didn’t have the experience that well known Terroir regions of the world like France and Italy had. So the solution was to say it didn’t matter and that we were every bit as good as any other country ( even if we weren’t ) . With increased numbers of wineries and vineyards in BC we then had to stand out from our neighbouring winery. The best way to do that is to then say my piece of dirt is better than my completion down the street or down the valley. The viticulturists started to do soil pit tests, ground penetrating radar analysis and sophisticated temperature recording and modelling. The winemakers started identifying the specific Terroir locations on the properties and vinifying the lots separately . Suddenly they started to realize certain batches were more aromatic, deeper in colour or had a structure that would allow them to age longer. This experimentation leads to the identification of the best spots and Voila ! Single vineyard wines are born, you can charge more for your wine, brand expansion happens and if the market agrees with your assessment then your price for the vineyard can be substantially more when you sell. syncromesh2 Who does this well in British Columbia ? I’ll give you one example Synchromesh Winery in Okanagan Falls. Alan Dickinson is making world class Riesling that are unique , flavorful and compete with some of the best wines in the world. Buy them cellar them and thank me later. Just leave some for me. Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ . Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot  

Spit Happens #45 – Gruner Veltliner

Gruner Veltliner isn’t exactly a grape variety that comes to mind when you are thinking of classic age worthy wines. If it isn’t in your repertoire it deserves to be. Gruner Veltliner or Gruve ( as all the cool kids call it ) is an unrecognized superstar in the age worthy white wine category. Many years ago in my other life I attended a lecture at the Society of Wine Educators Conference in Vancouver BC. The keynote speaker was Terry Theise. Terry is the import partner for a high quality importer in the United States called Skurnik Wines. I have long considered this agent the premiere National importer of European wines to the US. Terry showed us wines the Austria that had not been available in our market for years. A scandal in the Austria wine market meant there was a long period with no availability of the wines in many parts of the world. He poured us 20 year old Gruner Veltliner that was clean and showed very little oxidation. It was reminiscent of great aged Chassagne Montrachet. I was stunned and the room positively vibrated with excitement . We immediately made plans for Austrian wines to be a part of the Marquis Wine Cellars offerings. Producers such as Nigl, Prager, Solomon and Kracher became a staple in the store. That got me thinking about Gruve and other places it might do very well. Mendocino or Santa Barbara might be possible locations but how about closer to home ? There was a time when I thought it might do well in Naramata and I actively lobbied a winery there to plant it with no success . I shelved the idea and went back to doing what I do best ,selling wine. Then what do you know ? I started to see a few people testing it out . Currently I know of 4 places it’s planted , De Vine in Saanich ( not currently listed on their website ) Border Town , Summerhill and Culmina. While I have not tasted the first 3 lately I have tried the Culmina Wines since the first release and they have impressed me a lot. Fresh and clean with a nice bright core of acid and enough texture that would lead me to believe they could age 10-15 years. Check out Culmina at http://www.culmina.ca/ And buy some. They say up to 3 years aging . I think this could and should go much longer. culmina Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/. Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot

Spit Happens #44 – ISO Wine Glasses

ISO Wine Glasses now at Wine Cellar Depot!

ISO WIne Glasses In the last issue of Spit Happens I briefly mentioned ISO Wine Glasses. After that post I received a few questions about ISO Glasses. Mainly asking what they are and why you would need them. I guess being around wine educators and students so much made me ignorant of the fact that not everyone knows what they are. International Standards Organisation or ISO wine glasses are recognized internationally as the standard design for tasting and sensory evaluation for wine professionals and education. They are highly unlikely to break. Exceptionally clear and dishwasher safe ( this is super useful since wine classes will often use 8 to 10 stems per student per class). The glasses are manufactured to exacting standards for height diameter and volume. In my view they also make a perfectly designed glass for travel if you are visiting fellow wine nerds for an evening of study ( yes I call it study) . The small volume in ISO wine glasses means the ratio of liquid to air can be maintained with a smaller portion of wine. This in turn allows more samples of wine per bottle. Class size is usually determined by tastes per 750ml bottle. ISO Wine Glasses In my experience the usage of ISO wine glasses  is limited to trade tastings , educational settings and vertical tastings ( when you are tasting multiple vintages from the same producer). With a larger sample of wine in the glass it’s utility is lessened as it’s more likely to spill. The glass is also pretty good at highlighting flaws like oxidation or TCA ( cork taint). I have had some success with smaller portions of port and sherry from the glass. 60 to 70 ml has been the range best used. Order your ISO Glasses online now at our new website here: https://winecellardepot.com/merchandise/iso-professional-wine-tasting-glass/ Register Today as a Wine Cellar PRO member (wine school (WSET), restaurant, bar, winery, catering or rental group) and for just $99/year you will receive a 50% discount off of all orders and we will warehouse your glassware.  We guarantee that we will always be in stock. Thanks for your time. If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ . Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers David Lancelot