Beer that you can cellar

Today I would like to talk about other things you can put in your cellar . I love wine but have you thought about putting away some beer for a few years and see what happens ? What is the impact on beer when it ages ? Cellaring’s Effects on Taste and Flavor

Aging can produce many changes in the flavors and tastes present in a beer. Here are some of effects you can expect, according to a presentation given by Dr.Charlie Bamforth, Tom Nielsen and Mitch Steele entitled “Keep It Fresh: Understanding How Time, Temperature and Oxygen Impact Your Beer, and What To Do About Them.”

•Bitterness decreases
•Harshness increases
•Fruity and floral esters decrease
•Ribes (catty/black currant character) increase
•Wet paper/cardboard character increases
•Bready character increases
•Sweetness (toffee/honey) increases
•Metallic character increases
•Earthy character increases
•Straw character increases
•Woody character increases
•Vinuous character (wine/sherry/stale fruit) increases •Meaty-like/brothy flavors can develop

Probably ten years ago I started setting aside large bottles of Chimay Red label Trappist beers from Belgium. These beers have been made by Trappist Monks since 1850. They are unfiltered and develop a huge range of flavor profiles when aged 5-10 years. They are brilliant with long slow cooked meats and stews and super friendly with cheese. http://chimay.com/en/

Next on my list of beers that can age is Unibroue Grande Reserve 17 . First produced in 2007 in Chambly Quebec this beer is brewed once a year and probably has as many fans in the wine world as it does in the beer world. It is a top fermented dark amber Belgian Ale , a little bit cloudy with lots of fine bubbles and medium weight hop character 33 IBU. Great with mole and other Mexican specialties also good with BBQ brisket. https://www.unibroue.com/en/our-beers/17-grande-reserve/11

I would also look for sour beers to age. After a career in wine I find highly hopped wine a challenge. Mainly because wine professionals are trained to consider bitterness a pejorative and that’s what hops brings to the table. Sour beers are all about acidity which wine lovers don’t seem to have a problem with. Sour in the Rye by Bruery Terreux in Orange County California would be another beer I would keep an eye out for http://www.brueryterreux.com/beer/sour-in-the-rye-2/? category=sour-ales Barrel aged and a significant amount of rye make this a super interesting 2-3 year aging project . Lots of fantastic comment on this beer on Ratebeer.com https://www.ratebeer.com/beer/bruery-terreux-sour-in-the-rye/108234/

Thanks for your time.

If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ .

Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot

Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers

David Lancelot

Cheese, the low Road

“What is the difference between a winemaker and God ? God doesn’t think he is a winemaker….”

In blog post 27 I talked about some of the great cheeses made in the world that are wine friendly. The problem is those cheeses can be difficult to get once you are outside of Vancouver. Les Amis Du Fromage and Benton Brothers are great shops but what happens if you live in Kelowna or Prince Rupert ? I realize the choices for great cheese become limited and the options for unpasteurized import cheese are almost zero. With that in mind I thought I would come back and talk about my favorite options for higher production volume cheese that are more widely available.

• Oka cheese from Quebec. This cheese has been in production since 1893. It started out being made by Trappist Monks at Oka Abbey in Deux-Montagnes, Quebec and was based on the recipe for Port Salut. Since 1981 it has been made by the manufacturer Agropur. Oka has a wide distribution in supermarket chains and is well suited for red wines. Generally I enjoy whites with cheese over red but this is my exception. http://www.pleasureandcheeses.ca/cheeses/family/oka

• Coastal Cheddar is made by Ford Farm Cheesemakers in Dorchester England. It is a white cheddar that has a distinctive distinctive crunch – a result of the calcium lactate crystals which form naturally in the cheese as it matures. This cheese is brilliant for the money. Widely available in North America and one of the top selling imported cheddar’s for a reason. The price at Costco is exceptional as well. Super thin slices on a cheese board with white burgundy are sublime. Grate the leftovers into a frittata and you are gold ! https://www.fordfarm.com/

• Here is my wild card pick .Le Cendrillon (“Cendrillon” means “Cinderella” in French) is a vegetable ash-covered, soft, surface-ripened goat cheese that was crowned the ‘Best Cheese in the World’ at the 2009 World Cheese Awards. It was the first cheese from Quebec to ever receive such a prestigious honour. Made by the big Canadian Cheese manufacturer Saputo. Worth a hunt to track this down. Fantastic with Loire Valley whites and Belgian Ales. https://www.alexisdeportneuf.com/en/Products/Goat-Cheese/le-cendrillon

If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ .

Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot

Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers

David Lancelot

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