Spit Happens #39 – Amplitude 2

Since my last post was well received I thought I would give you some examples of wines I would recommend for outdoor drinking.

My all time favorite outside patio BBQ drinking wine would be Turley Wine Cellars Old Vines Zinfandel from California. Founded by Dr Larry Turley and the first few vintages were made by renowned winemaker Helen Turley. My old employer was the first to bring this wine into Canada. At one point we had the largest retail allocation in the world. Currently they have a large quantity of the  Turley 2015 Old Vines Zinfandel  at $59.89 a bottle. My rule of thumb for drinking window on most Zinfandel is 5-7 years. That said I’m quite happy to drink this wine the day I bring it home. Black fruit , bramble and vanilla. Tons of rich dense fruit are packed in to this wine. If you have any tomato based BBQ sauce and ribs this is it. Call me anytime to drink this and I’ll be there.

Bodega Garzon Single Vineyard Tannat from famed wine guru Alberto Antonini is available from New District Wines. This beauty is a beast ! From Uruguay Tannat is a dark inky red that will stain you teeth for a few days. Definitely for outside drinking as you don’t want to spill it on the carpet. Tannat is well known in France as the base wine for reds from Madiran. Dense and chewy and highly recommended with a nice piece of prime rib and chimichurri sauce. I find it impossible to argue with that suggestion.

The next classic option is Shiraz/Syrah Cote Rotie is probably too fancy for BBQ but who am I to judge go for it if you have any that’s a bit on the younger end of the range. Save the old Guigal ones for later in the year. Penfolds Bin 28 Kalimna Shiraz 2015 for for 50$ is a wine that could make any evening on the patio stellar. Kalimna is the vineyard source for a large majority of grapes that end up in Penfolds Grange, one of the highest regarded reds in Australia with an unmatched track record. While this isn’t baby Grange you might think of it as a copy of a copy. Nice red and black fruit profile with a bit more savory notes than the first two wines. Drink or cellar for the next 4-8 years.

So thaw out some critters, grind a bunch of peppercorns and throw them on the BBQ and break out the big guns. No wimpy wines.
Thanks for your time.

If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ .

Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning. http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot 

Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food.

Cheers
David Lancelot

 

Spit Happens #38 – Amplitude

During my time in the wine and food business I have been fortunate to try many 1000’s of wines and had the luxury of time to think about food and wine in a way that most people would not consider. One of my more recent topics that I think about and talk about daily on my wine tours is the concept of amplitude.  A simple definition is the difference between the top of a peak on an oscilloscope and the bottom of the wave , in sound it would be the range of sound in a musical piece from the quietest to the loudest passage. It has an application in wine but I would like to explain it first as it relates to the playback of music. Lets assume you have a Bluetooth speaker connected to your phone and you are listening to it in your car or a small room in your home. Then you go and sit in your backyard or take it to the beach. You will likely have to increase the volume to hear it because the space is much bigger, there is ambient noise and maybe a breeze as well.  I have started to explain to my guests when I take them out that wine behaves in much the same way. If you are in your office or dining room of your home and you are having a nice glass of Burgundy or Beaujolais you can enjoy its subtle characteristics . Take it to the backyard on a breezy afternoon and you might not taste anything at all. Why is that ? The answer is amplitude. More delicate wines can be easily overwhelmed by air movement outside. What happens when you can’t smell ? Taste becomes distorted and muted on the wines. So how does this relate to the average wine drinker ? Well my advice is save the Burgundy for inside and bring out the big guns for the backyard BBQ and camping.  I call these wines big stupid wines for big stupid people and I’m one of them.  Got a big rich Aussie Shiraz from Torbreck or Langmeil ? Bring it on.  Zinfandel from Sonoma or Sierra Nevada foothills ? Outside in the summer is the time for that. Save those pretty wines for the fall or indoor drinking.

Thanks for your time.
If you have any feedback we would love to hear from you on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/winecellardepot/ .

Also check out our Houzz Page for design ideas and planning.
http://www.houzz.com/pro/winecellardepot/wine-cellar-depot

Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers
David Lancelot

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