Beer that you can cellar

Today I would like to talk about other things you can put in your cellar . I love wine but have you thought about putting away some beer for a few years and see what happens ? What is the impact on beer when it ages ? Cellaring’s Effects on Taste and Flavor

Aging can produce many changes in the flavors and tastes present in a beer. Here are some of effects you can expect, according to a presentation given by Dr.Charlie Bamforth, Tom Nielsen and Mitch Steele entitled “Keep It Fresh: Understanding How Time, Temperature and Oxygen Impact Your Beer, and What To Do About Them.”

•Bitterness decreases
•Harshness increases
•Fruity and floral esters decrease
•Ribes (catty/black currant character) increase
•Wet paper/cardboard character increases
•Bready character increases
•Sweetness (toffee/honey) increases
•Metallic character increases
•Earthy character increases
•Straw character increases
•Woody character increases
•Vinuous character (wine/sherry/stale fruit) increases •Meaty-like/brothy flavors can develop

Probably ten years ago I started setting aside large bottles of Chimay Red label Trappist beers from Belgium. These beers have been made by Trappist Monks since 1850. They are unfiltered and develop a huge range of flavor profiles when aged 5-10 years. They are brilliant with long slow cooked meats and stews and super friendly with cheese. http://chimay.com/en/

Next on my list of beers that can age is Unibroue Grande Reserve 17 . First produced in 2007 in Chambly Quebec this beer is brewed once a year and probably has as many fans in the wine world as it does in the beer world. It is a top fermented dark amber Belgian Ale , a little bit cloudy with lots of fine bubbles and medium weight hop character 33 IBU. Great with mole and other Mexican specialties also good with BBQ brisket. https://www.unibroue.com/en/our-beers/17-grande-reserve/11

I would also look for sour beers to age. After a career in wine I find highly hopped wine a challenge. Mainly because wine professionals are trained to consider bitterness a pejorative and that’s what hops brings to the table. Sour beers are all about acidity which wine lovers don’t seem to have a problem with. Sour in the Rye by Bruery Terreux in Orange County California would be another beer I would keep an eye out for http://www.brueryterreux.com/beer/sour-in-the-rye-2/? category=sour-ales Barrel aged and a significant amount of rye make this a super interesting 2-3 year aging project . Lots of fantastic comment on this beer on Ratebeer.com https://www.ratebeer.com/beer/bruery-terreux-sour-in-the-rye/108234/

Thanks for your time.

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Remember Spit Happens, tell your friends, drink great wine and eat great food. Cheers

David Lancelot